Whistler Hiking TrailsVictoria has a seemingly endless number of amazing hiking trails.  Most take you to wild and beautiful Pacific Ocean views and others take you to tranquil lakes in beautiful BC Coastal Rainforest wilderness.  Regional Parks and Provincial Parks are everywhere you turn in Victoria and finding them is not too difficult.  These are some of the best of the best hiking trails in and around Victoria.

Victoria Hiking Trails

  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailAvatar Grove  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailBear Hill  Easy Hiking TrailEast Sooke Park  Victoria Hiking TrailElk/Beaver Lake  Victoria Hiking TrailEsquimalt Lagoon  Easy Pay Hiking Trail VictoriaFort Rodd Hill  Easy Hiking TrailFrancis/King  Victoria Hiking TrailGalloping Goose  Easy Hiking TrailGoldstream Park  Easy Hiking TrailGowlland Tod  Easy Hiking TrailGrass Lake  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailJohn Dean Park  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailJuan de Fuca Trail  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailLone Tree Hill  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailMill Hill  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailMount Douglas  Easy Hiking TrailMount Tolmie  Easy Hiking TrailSooke Potholes  Victoria Hiking TrailSpectacle Lake  Easy Hiking TrailThetis Lake  Victoria Hiking TrailWitty's Lagoon

Clayoquot Hiking Trails

  Easy Hiking TrailThe Big Tree Trail  Easy Hiking TrailHot Springs Cove  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailLone Cone  Easy Hiking TrailNuu Chah Nulth  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailRadar Beach  Steep, Dog Friendly TrailRadar Hill  Easy Hiking TrailVargas Island  Virgin Falls  Easy Hiking TrailWild Pacific Trail

Victoria Hiking Trails RatingJuan de Fuca Trail is a beautiful wilderness trail that hugs the west coast of Vancouver Island between Jordan River(north of Sooke) and Port Renfrew.  Established as a provincial park in 1995, the Juan de Fuca Trail traces its origins to the 1889 telegraph line that connected Victoria and Bamfield.  The telegraph line connected Bamfield to the British Empire via a transpacific cable. This cable required patrolmen to routinely check the line.  Linesmen were housed in in cabins along the route.  Juan de Fuca Trail and the West Coast Trail share this function, however, the West Coast Trail continued to function as a lifesaving trail, long after what would eventually be the Juan de Fuca Trail fell into disuse.  Decades later, in the 1970's, with the growing popularity of the West Coast Trail, a renewed interest in the area continued to grow.  Public interest in the area collided with logging companies pushing into the area.  The Victoria Sierra Club filed lawsuits in an attempt to halt logging in the Sombrio Creek and Parkinson Creek regions.  The Victoria Sierra Club was successful in halting  the logging and the "West Coast Strip" was preserved as a future park.  Finally in the 1990's the provincial government acquired and set aside land for the proposed provincial park.  The beautiful 47 kilometre Juan de Fuca Trail we see today was finally constructed and officially designated as the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail in Juan de Fuca Provincial Park.  The trail and the park are simply known as Juan de Fuca Trail. The park is named after Juan de Fuca Strait, the large channel of water that separates Vancouver Island from the mainland of North America.  Juan de Fuca Strait is also the international boundary between Canada and the United States.  Juan de Fuca was a Greek sailer and explored the area four centuries ago and originally name it the "Strait of Anian".  In 1787 British Captain Charles Barkley, following Juan de Fuca's writings about the area two centuries earlier, rediscovered "Juan de Fuca's" strait.  The name stuck, and it has been known ever since as the Juan de Fuca Strait. As a Vancouver Island coast hiking trail, Juan de Fuca Trail is comparable to the world renowned West Coast Trail.  There are some distinct differences however.  The Juan de Fuca Trail is much tamer and easily accessible at numerous access trailheads, whereas the West Coast Trail has only three access points.  The West Coast Trail is brutally difficult with many difficult ladders and water crossings and is effectively a 75 kilometre, self sustained trek through the wilderness.  Juan de Fuca Trail has few challenging sections and no frightening ladder climbs or cable car crossings to negotiate.  Also, owing to the number of access points, Juan de Fuca Trail is usually hiked in sections as daytrips or short 1 night trips.

Juan de Fuca Provincial Park Hike in Victoria

Victoria Hiking Trails RatingAvatar Grove and Canada's gnarliest tree is an amazing thing to see and finding it is half the fun.  The cute little town of Port Renfrew, known for it's logging, amazing fishing and home of one of the trailheads to the world renowned West Coast Trail, is now reworking it's image to include this fantastic wonder.  Dubbed Canada's gnarliest tree this mammoth cedar will surely leap from the unknown to the feature of millions of tourist photos in the coming days and years.  Avatar Grove is a 50 hectare area of old growth forest it has shot to prominence in this part of the world and groups everywhere you look are embracing it as something to be saved, admired and loved.  Not cut into lumber.  The Victoria based Ancient Forest Alliance is at the forefront of rescuing and protecting Avatar Forest.  They discovered, named and drove it into the world's eyes.  Avatar Grove is slowly growing into a hiking destination.  Wooden stars and a boardwalk is being constructed and seems to grow month to month.  There is even a viewing platform for the gnarly tree at an ideal location to take in the view.  Though Avatar Grove and Canada's gnarliest tree is a couple hours drive from Victoria, the drive is very scenic.  The various sections/trailheads of the Juan de Fuca Trail are all easy stops on the way to Avatar Grove. East Sooke Regional Park, Witty's Lagoon, Fort Rodd Hill and many more sights are also located along the way.

Avatar Grove Hike in Victoria

Victoria Hiking Trails RatingEast Sooke Regional Park is a convenient and easily accessible way to experience the wild, west coast of Vancouver Island.  Weather blasted rocky cliffs, sandy beaches and deep coastal forest trails run throughout the park.  Every few minutes along the coast you come to another startlingly desolate ocean vantage point.  Everything about East Sooke Regional Park is just great and should not be missed on a trip to Victoria anytime of the year.  The sheer size of this park and number of trails, over 50 kilometres of them.  The Coastal Trail, almost 12 kilometres long, stretches out linearly in an array of pocket beaches, rocky viewpoints and fantastically alive tide pools.  It hugs the cliff, ducks into the forest and back out to another stunning ocean viewpoint.  It does this over and over again.  Dozens of times, and not once does it get boring.  The Strait of Juan de Fuca and swirling mass of green and blue stretches out toward the Olympic Mountains in the United States. East Sooke Regional Park has three main access points and trailheads.  This allows the huge park to be divided up into three manageable parts, each one with very different attributes.  The Aylard Farm trailhead is the easy, family friendly and relaxing way to see East Sooke Regional Park.  A few short, 5 minute trails take you down to beaches, tidal pools and picnic areas.  The Anderson Cove trailhead is popular with hikers tackling the more challenging trails to Babbington Hill and Mount Maguire.  The Pike Road trailhead is the furthest west access to East Sooke Park with an easy, 1.5 kilometre trail leading down to Iron Mine Beach.

East Sooke Park Hike in Victoria

Victoria Hiking Trails Rating for Witty's LagoonWitty’s Lagoon Regional Park is a wonderful coastal park overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  Located in Metchosin, a scenic and largely rural community that is part of the Western Communities. If you are driving from downtown Victoria, you are just a 30 minute drive away and much of that drive is quite nice.  Fort Rodd Hill and Esquimalt Lagoon are definitely worth visiting on the way to Witty’s Lagoon. Witty’s Lagoon Regional Park is a very family friendly park with its large beach, Nature Centre and over 5 kilometres of forest hiking trails. With the tide out a huge salt marsh is revealed, teeming with life. Over 160 species of birds have been documented in the park.  This sand dune ecosystem is fun to explore and attracts bird watchers as well as frolicking dogs. The cute little Nature Centre is located at the main parking area for Witty’s Lagoon. Here you will find helpful CRD Regional Parks staff and volunteer naturalists ready to answer questions and help introduce you to the park. The Nature Centre is only open weekends and holidays from 12pm to 4pm. Past the Nature Centre you become immersed in a forest unexpectedly large Douglas-fir trees. The nice, wide trail sloped downward slightly as you walk along Bilston Creek and past Sitting Lady Falls. These falls are not terribly large or impressive, but marvelously scenic in this deep, dark forest. As Victoria hiking trails go, Witty’s Lagoon is not overly exciting. The Thetis Lake trails, for example are much more scenic as they skirt the lake, often from high above. What makes Witty’s Lagoon Regional Park a wonderful place to visit is because of a variety of nice features. The first great feature is its location. Metchosin is a rural, coastal escape from the big city. When you visit the park, you often find longtime locals who evidently visit the park frequently.

Witty's Lagoon Regional Park Hike in Victoria

Preview All Victoria Hiking Trails Here...

Hiking Trails & CampingWhistler   Hiking Trails & CampingSquamish  Hiking Trails & CampingVancouver  Hiking Trails & CampingClayoquot  Hiking Trails & CampingVictoria  Hiking Trails & CampingWest Coast Trail

Introduction to Victoria

VictoriaVictoria VictoriaAttractions VictoriaAttractions VictoriaEasy Hiking Trails VictoriaModerate Trails VictoriaChallenging Trails

The Galloping Goose Regional Trail developed from a disused railway line begins at the Johnson Street bridge in downtown Victoria and goes in two directions.  One direction goes to the Vancouver ferry ...
Read more
The Elk & Beaver Lake Trail is one of many beautiful lakeside trails in Victoria.  From the convenient parking lot the trail is mostly flat, gravel or dirt, densely forested at times and runs around both Elk and ...
Read more
The wilderness hiking trails in Francis/King Regional Park take you past massive, old-growth Douglas Fir trees.  Some estimated to be as old as 500 years and the Elsie King interpretive trail gives beautiful ...
Read more
The Juan de Fuca Trail is a beautiful wilderness trail that hugs the west coast of Vancouver Island between Jordan River(north of Sooke) and Port Renfrew.  Established as a provincial park in 1995, the Juan de ...
Read more

Vargas Island Provincial Park is a popular hiking, camping and kayaking destination due to its great location close to Tofino.  It has wonderful, wilderness camping for free and a beautiful feeling of ...
Read more
Lone Cone is the wonderful cone shaped mountain that dominates the skyline in Tofino.  It is just 6k from Tofino on the north-western end of Meares Island.  Lone Cone is an incredible hike to do while in ...
Read more
Radar Beach is one of the countless places that makes this part of the world so amazing.  It is difficult to get to due to it having an unmarked trailhead, steep and muddy trail, and considerable climbing and ...
Read more
Meares Island was the centre of dispute in the 80's when the Nuu-chah-nulth protested Macmillan Bloedel's intent to log the island.  The Nuu-chah-nulth together with environmental groups blockaded the island and ...
Read more

The route from Darling River to Tsusiat Falls is just under 12 kilometres and quite a lot of that distance can be hiked on the beach. From Darling River you can take an inland route or walk along the beach. ...
Read more
Day 1 on the West Coast Trail hiking south from the Pachena trailhead is a fairly relaxing first day. Your first beach, Pachena Beach is a lovely, wide, sandy arch that stretches to a thick wall of forest on ...
Read more